NOTE: This article was originally written by Andrew Hepburn on Sept 16, 2000 and has been updated by Shaun Wood on February 12, 2010.

KNOWN COMPATIBLE PLAYERS:

Pioneer PR-8210
Pioneer PR-8210A (via IR)
Pioneer LD-1100

 

 

FORMAT:

(as generated by M.A.C.H.3 boardset)

Each command is sent in a series of 11 pulses. The space between two pulses indicates a 1 or 0.  Each command is sent as 10 digits (there are 10 spaces between 11 pulses).  A small space (1.05 mSec) between two pulses indicates a 0.  A large space (2.1 mSec) between two pulses indicates a 1.
(note: Each "pulse" is actually a 38kHz square wave with a duration of 260 uSec. In other words, it's 10 pulses of 26 uSec each.)

Each command is repeated twice.  Each command is terminated by 0000000000, designated as EOC (End Of Command).  For example, a play command would be sent as:  "Play Play EOC".

The search command is issued both before and after the frame number and is terminated by EOC EOC EOC.  For example, a search command would be sent as:
"Search Search EOC # # EOC # # EOC # # EOC # # EOC # # EOC Search Search EOC EOC EOC EOC".

Each command starts with 001 and ends with 00.  Each command is designated by 5 digits.  For example, the digits for a play command would be sent as:  "0011010000" (a leading 001, 5 digits to indicate the command, and an ending 00).

The 5 digits for the "Play" command are 10100.
Here are the digits sent for a play command:

0011010000 0011010000 0000000000 (Play Play EOC)

The 5 digits for the "Search" command are 11010.
Here are the digits sent for a 'Search 12345' command:

0011101000 0011101000 0000000000 (Search Search EOC)
0011000100 0011000100 0000000000 (1 1 EOC)
0010100100 0010100100 0000000000 (2 2 EOC)
0011100100 0011100100 0000000000 (3 3 EOC)
0010010100 0010010100 0000000000 (4 4 EOC)
0011010100 0011010100 0000000000 (5 5 EOC)
0011101000 0011101000 0000000000 (Search Search EOC)
0000000000 0000000000 0000000000 (EOC EOC EOC)
 

 

COMMANDS:

These commands were taken from the output of the RU-8210 Remote Control Unit.

The "Fixed" version is generated by stripping off the leading "001" and trailing "00", and then reversing the order of the remaining 5 bits.

 

COMMAND

CODE

Fixed Code in Hex

3X FWD

0011000000

01h

SCAN FWD

0010100000

02h

SLOW FWD

0011100000

03h

STEP FWD

0010010000

04h

PLAY

0011010000

05h

3X REV

0010110000

06h

SCAN REV

0011110000

07h

SLOW REV

0010001000

08h

STEP REV

0010010000

09h

PAUSE

0010101000

0Ah

SEARCH

0011101000

0Bh

CHAPTER

0010011000

0Ch

AUDIO 2/R

0011011000

0Dh

AUDIO 1/L

0010111000

0Eh

REJECT

0011111000

0Fh

0

0010000100

10h

1

0011000100

11h

2

0010100100

12h

3

0011100100

13h

4

0010010100

14h

5

0011010100

15h

6

0010110100

16h

7

0011110100

17h

8

0010001100

18h

9

0011001100

19h

FRAME DISP.

0010101100

1Ah

 

 

OTHER INFORMATION:

Both M.A.C.H. 3 and Us vs. Them require the video signal to turn off and on in order to recognize a seek performed.  If this is not done, the game will sit there and seek over and over forever. The Pioneer LD-V8000 is the only player I know of that can be configured to drop the video signal during searches. To do this, set DOC control (Drop Out Compensation) to OFF. There is no corresponding command that I know of on the Sony-LDP series to do this, except for turning the motor off and on.  This however results in a 15 second wait while the player spins back up.  Using the video off and on commands do not work as they put out a 'black' screen. The video signal still exists (if you actually unplug the video cable and plug it back in suddenly the game recognizes the seek).  My best guess is that the Pioneer PR-8210 actually shuts the video signal off and on momentarily when it seeks.  Someone could probably reproduce this by using a relay to shut off the video when a seek happens.

 

The output from the M.A.C.H. 3 board comes from a ground-supplying open collector transistor. It is delivered on the center conductor of the cable going to the PR-8210. The shield conductor supplies +5V.  To use this signal, place a 470-ohm resistor across the two wires and read the signal from the center conductor.
 


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